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ANTIQUE FURNITURE RESTORATION DISCUSSION BOARD

Re: Desktop Veneer

Posted By: James Schooley <furnitureissues@earthlink.net> (0-1pool247-207.nas2.sioux-city1.ia.us.da.qwest.net)
Date: 4/11/5 23:02

In Response To: Desktop Veneer (Tim Crabtree)

I think you have a good concept. Many of these surfaces have disrupted veneer layers because no middle layers of veneer were used to prevent the telegraphing of lower strata from tearing the top skin as shifting and shrinkage take place. A good coarse would be to get some of the extra thick poplar (1/8" is often used) you can resaw it yourself. Then an American walnut veneer should get you a bit closer to the right color after bleaching. The actual veneer may have been butternut, even if not, that will be a good choice in case American walnut isn't right. Butternut resembles walnut very much, when stained, as they are closely related trees. As for a flexible glue, that would be contact cement, and while I have used it for years, I now avoid it at all costs. The quality is not what it used to be and I have to apply several coats to get it to be strong enough to stay put in all situations. Sometimes the open grain of certain woods would let the stain and finish solvent enter the glue layer and loose spots would result. Also you have to get the positioning perfect or the veneer is set and there is no slipping it even a little bit. My first choice today for veneer glue is a uriaformaldehide glue. It will give you more slip time, is very strong and won't loosen with solvent saturation or water. The best way to use this glue is with a vacuum bag but that's not the only way either, any clamp ing method will work. A paper back veneer is the best way to go if you decide to use a veneer. But now that the wood has finished shrinking, pretty much, you may not have to worry about that issue returning. But as far as resawing thick layers of veneer, it will probably work fine as well, and a common wood glue, even hide glue, will do since the buckling factor of a water base won't be as much of a factor with a thick layer, just test it first.

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