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ANTIQUE FURNITURE RESTORATION DISCUSSION BOARD

Re: Ho do I remove Soot/grime off of my maple bdrm

Posted By: Tom <tcassidy@yahoo.com> (4.78.53.78)
Date: 9/18/4 14:14

In Response To: Ho do I remove Soot/grime off of my maple bdrm set (Mike)

I found this article recently since I have a small piece of furniture that was in a house fire. Hope it helps

Restoration Options Restoration Options Now it’s decision time! Consider the facts found in your initial inspection, examine the basic options available in any restoration situation and clean, resurface or replace as indicated. Basically, there are four cleaning or refinishing alternatives available to restorers. We’ll start with cleaning and polishing and progress to “refinishing” options in a future article:

The Cleaning and polishing option is selected when light soot residue is observed on the exterior of surfaces. It includes the following steps:

Removing dry soot. Dry sponge loose soot residue from all surfaces, particularly those that are porous. Moisture can cause loose soot particles to migrate within wood pores and cause permanent discoloration, if not removed while in a dry particle state.

Selecting cleaning agent. Next, select a mild general-purpose detergent and mix it according to the label for light-duty cleaning. General-purpose wall-washing compounds or mild cleaners like Murphy’s Oil Soap® do a nice job here. Of course, the addition of a water-based deodorant to the cleaning compound is the beginning of the odor removal effort.

Applying cleaning agent. Saturate a terry cloth towel in the detergent solution and wring it out carefully. Vigorously agitate soot on wood surfaces with the wood grain only, rotating the towel as it absorbs suspended residue.

Drying. Absorb excess moisture with towels and force dry with air movement if required.

Polishing. Polish finished wood surfaces with a quality oil-based furniture polish. The combination of acid soot residues and mild detergents remove natural oils from wood furniture, causing finishes to dry and crack over time. Replace these oils with repeated applications of polish if total restoration is to occur. For furniture that’s been subjected to severe use (scratches, gouges), an oil-based polish with a stain added (“scratch cover”) considerably improves its appearance. However, never apply stained furniture polish to “blond,” light-colored, or unfinished furniture.

Jeff Bishop - Jeff Bishop, Clean Care Seminars Inc. administrator, is the carpet cleaning industry's most prolific author with several books on cleaning, disaster restoration and related subjects. He teaches and lectures at well over 60 schools, workshops and industry conventions annually. He also provides consulting services for the carpet and insurance industries.

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