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ANTIQUE FURNITURE RESTORATION DISCUSSION BOARD

Re: Removing Polyurethane from Oak Treads

Posted By: James Schooley (0-1pool246-206.nas2.sioux-city1.ia.us.da.qwest.net)
Date: 4/4/4 00:16

In Response To: Re: Removing Polyurethane from Oak Treads (Greg Scholl)

Don't forget that shellac was dilluted down for many years, poor shellac is not a good comparison to anything. Good shellac has all the properties that any serious finisher would want for antiques or fine furniture. Look at the fantastic finishes on pianos, the only way you can get that kind of finish is with wet dry sanding and lots of coats, no poly can do that as of today. In fact no serious furniture manufacturer will even use a poly type finish. As for soft, that too depends on the quality of the shellac, or what ever we have to compare. Agree on one thing, poly is hard, too hard. That is why it chips and cracks so easily. All wood has movement, flexebility is what is needed to make a lasting finish. The most flexible finish is varnish, that is why it is the best boat finish, it bends no cracks, like poly, the hard finish. Under magnification poly becomes loaded with tiny cracks that allow water to penetrate easily. Probably the thing poly is best known for is it's ability to resint stripping, some of these finishes are so resistant to chemical removal that I have to scrape and sand it off. And that is expensive and death to antiques.

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